Posted in Book Reviews

Book Review: Wild

wild

Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed ~ 315 pages ~ published 3/20/12 by Knopf

Goodreads Synopsis:

At twenty-two, Cheryl Strayed thought she had lost everything. In the wake of her mother’s death, her family scattered and her own marriage was soon destroyed. Four years later, with nothing more to lose, she made the most impulsive decision of her life. With no experience or training, driven only by blind will, she would hike more than a thousand miles of the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State — and she would do it alone.
Told with suspense and style, sparkling with warmth and humor, Wild powerfully captures the terrors and pleasures of one young woman forging ahead against all odds on a journey that maddened, strengthened, and ultimately healed her.

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Bookish Speak: A Glossary of Terms in the Book World

bookishtermsglossary

I have been in the book blogging world for about 9 months now, and I worked in a bookstore for about 3 years. That’s quite a bit of time spent around people who live and breathe books. I have noticed that my vocabulary has changed quite a bit, to the point where I will sometimes have to explain what something means to my friends and family members who aren’t immersed in this world on the regular. So, I decided that it might be beneficial to many if I were to compile a glossary of bookish terms!

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Book Review: The Poet X

thepoetx

The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo ~ 368 pages ~ published 3/6/18 by HarperTeen

Goodreads Synopsis:

A young girl in Harlem discovers slam poetry as a way to understand her mother’s religion and her own relationship to the world. Debut novel of renowned slam poet Elizabeth Acevedo.

Xiomara Batista feels unheard and unable to hide in her Harlem neighborhood. Ever since her body grew into curves, she has learned to let her fists and her fierceness do the talking.

But Xiomara has plenty she wants to say, and she pours all her frustration and passion onto the pages of a leather notebook, reciting the words to herself like prayers—especially after she catches feelings for a boy in her bio class named Aman, who her family can never know about. With Mami’s determination to force her daughter to obey the laws of the church, Xiomara understands that her thoughts are best kept to herself.

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